Change is About Discovering the Delight of Knowing and Serving God

“…change is about discovering the delight of knowing and serving God. Our job is to stop wallowing around in the dirt and instead to enjoy knowing God, to give up our cheap imitations and enjoy the real thing. All too often we think of holiness as giving up the pleasures of sin for some worthy but drab life. But holiness means recognizing that the pleasures of sin are empty and temporary, while God is inviting us to magnificent, true, full, and rich pleasures that last forever.”

– Tim Chester, You Can Change, p.36

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The Inexpressible Comfort of the Throne of Grace

‘Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need!’ (Hebrews 4:16)

“Oh the comfort, the inexpressible comfort of the throne of grace! It is the only verdant, refreshing spot, in this earth’s wide wilderness.

To have the sensible presence of God, the heart of a loving Father to confide in, who is able to do all and more than we require; to have Him always near, His hand ever stretched out to us–oh, the comfort!

This is my sweetest spot and chief comfort in this polluted world, where I carry all my cares and troubles, and am ever sure to receive a welcome in the face of a reconciled Father.

Oh, the loving heart of Christ! Although He knows our ten thousand infirmities, He does not turn a deaf ear to our poor supplications–but with His own blood, blots out all their imperfections!”

– Mary Winslow

Three Marks of Right Prayer

“I know if the grace of God be in you, it will be as natural to you to groan out your condition, as it is for a suckling child to cry for the breast. Prayer is one of the first things that discovers a man to be a Christian (Acts 9:12). But yet if it be right, it is such prayer as follows. (1) To desire God in Christ, for himself, for his holiness, love, wisdom, and glory. For right prayer, as it run only to God through Christ, so it centres in him, and in him alone. ‘Whom have I in heaven but thee? And there is none upon earth that I desire,’ long for, or seek after, ‘beside thee’ (Psalm 73:25). (2) That the soul might enjoy continually communion with him, both here and hereafter. ‘I shall be satisfied, when I awake with’ thine image, or in ‘thy likeness’ (Psalm 17:15). ‘For in this we groan earnestly’ (2 Corinthians 5:2). (3) Right prayer is accompanied with a continual labour after that which is prayed for. ‘My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning’ (Psalm 130:6). ‘I will rise now, I will seek him whom my soul loveth’ (Song of Soloman 3:2). For mark, I beseech you, there are two things that provoke to prayer. The one is a detestation of sin and the things of this life; the other is a longing desire after communion with God in a holy and undefiled state and inheritance.”

– John Bunyan, Prayer, p.47

Whatever the Believer Has or Lacks is From the Lord

“Knowing that he or she can trust in God, and confident that God will provide for all the needs of life, the godly man or woman submits to God’s provision and praises God for the wisdom with which he is overseeing his or her life: ‘The Lord is my chosen portion and my cup; you hold my lot. The lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; indeed, I have a beautiful inheritance’ (vv.5-6). The believer knows that whatever he has or lacks is from the Lord; he delights to know that it is a good and wise God who portions his blessings, the greatest of which is himself. If the believer has God,  that is more than enough.”

– Richard Phillips & Sharon Phillips, Holding Hands Holding Hearts, p.57

Resolution #1

“1. Resolved, that I will do whatsoever I think to be most to God’s glory, and my own good, profit and pleasure, in the whole of my duration, without any consideration of the time, whether now or never so many myriads of age hence. Resolved to do whatever I think to be my duty and most fro the good and advantage of mankind in general. Resolved to do this, whatever difficulties I meet with, how many soever, and how great soever.”

– Jonathan Edwards, Jonathan Edwards’ Resolutions

Sexual Sin is Idolatry

“The prophet Jonah, in the digestive tract of a great fish beneath the Mediterranean Sea, made this observation: ‘Those who cling to worthless idols forfeit the grace that could have been their’ (Jonah 2:8).

An idol is something more than a grotesque statue with big lips and a ruby in its navel. It’s a God-substitute. It’s something–anything–that we value higher than God. In order to cling to such an idol, we make a trade.

Our sexual behavior reveals who or what rules our lives (see Romans 1:18-29). Sexual sin is idolatry because it puts our desires in the place of God.

Those who turn from God to embrace a God-substitute suffer terrible loss. Why? Because they were made to find joy in God, not the substitute. They swap God’s present and future blessing for something they can immediately see, taste, or feel. But that something never satisfies.

– Randy Alcorn, The Purity Principle, p.12

What Can Compare to the Creator and Sustainer and Savior?

“When we put it plainly like this–as a direct choice between God and our stuff–most of us would hope that we would choose God. But we need to realize that how we spend our time, what our money goes toward, and where we will invest in our energy is equivalent to choosing God or rejecting Him. How could we think for even a second that something on this puny little earth compares to the Creator and Sustainer and Savior of it all?

We disgust God when we weigh and compare Him against the things of this world. It makes Him sick when we actually decide those things are better for us than God Himself. We believe we don’t need anything Jesus offers, but we fail to realize that slowly, almost imperceptibly, we are drifting downstream. And in the process we are becoming blind, being stripped naked, and turning into impoverished wretches.

No wonder Jesus says He will spit lukewarm people out of His mouth! [Revelation 3:15-17]”

– Francis Chan, Crazy Love, p.97