Fallin – Trip Lee Featuring J. Paul

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A Far More Glorious Song

“In Greek mythology, the Sirens would sing enchanting songs, drawing sailor irresistibly towards the rocks and certain shipwreck. Odysseus filled his crew’s ears with wax and had them tie him to the mast. This is like the approach to legalism. We bind ourselves up with laws and disciplines in a vain attempt to resist temptation. Orpheus, on the other hand, play such beautiful music on his harp that his sailors ignored the seduction of the Siren’s song. This is the way of faith. The grace of the gospel sings a far more glorious song than the enticements of sin, if only we have the faith to hear its music.”

– Tim Chester, You Can Change, p.57

By the Grace of God I Am What I Am

I am not what I ought to be. Ah! how imperfect and deficient. I am not what I might be, considering my privileges and opportunities. I am not what I wish to be. God, who knows my heart–knows I wish to be like Him. I am not what I hope to be. Before long, I will drop this clay tabernacle, to be like Him and see Him as He is! Yet, I am not what I once was–a child of sin, and slave of the devil! Though not all these–not what I ought to be, not what I might be, not what I wish or hope to be, and not what I once was–I think I can truly say with the apostle, “By the grace of God I am what I am!” (1 Corinthians 15:10)

– John Newton

Change is Not Only Possible, It’s Inevitable

“John says the end of the change process is certain: I will be like Jesus when I see him as he is (1 John 3:2). That means changes is not only possible, it’s inevitable!

I used to think that sanctification was a bit like pushing a boulder up a hill. It was hard, slow work, and if you lost concentration you might find yourself back at the bottom. But it’s more like a boulder rolling down a hill. There’s something inevitable about it, because it’s God’s work, and God always succeeds. The sad thing is that often I try to push the boulder back up the hill. I say in effect, ‘Don’t change me yet–I like doing that sin.'”

– Tim Chester, You Can Change, p.55

It Is God Himself Who Sanctifies Us

“It is God himself who sanctifies us (1 Thessalonians 5:23). Other therapies can modify behavior. Drugs can suppress the more extreme symptoms of  some problems. But only God can bring true and lasting change. And that’s because only God can change our hearts.”

– Tim Chester, You Can Change, p.46

No Spiritual Gains Without Pains

“Sanctification depends greatly on a diligent use of scriptural means. The ‘means of grace’ are such as Bible reading, private prayer, and regularly worshiping God in Church, wherein one hears the Word taught and participates in the Lord’s Supper. I lay it down as a simple matter of fact that no one who is careless about such things must ever expect to make much progress in sanctification. I can find no record of any eminent saint who ever neglected them. They are appointed channels through which the Holy Spirit conveys fresh supplies of grace to the soul and strengthens the work which He has begun in the inward man. Let men call this legal doctrine if they please, but I will never shrink from declaring my belief that there are no “spiritual gains without pains.” Our God is a God who works by means, and He will never bless the soul of that man who pretends to be so high and spiritual that he can get on without them.”

– J.C. Ryle, Holiness, p.25